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Revealed: The Leading Causes of Underinsurance and How to Fix It

No matter how bright the future looks for your business, you never know when disaster will strike. Whether it be a flood or destructive building fire, it is vital to have proper insurance policies to protect your business from any interruptions—especially if you are a SME with minimal financial flexibility. As a result, many businesses purchase business interruption (BI) policies for peace of mind in the event of unexpected disaster.

However, what happens when your BI policy fails to cover the entirety of your company’s financial loss? Unfortunately, this scenario is a common occurrence for businesses across the UK. The Chartered Institute of Loss Adjusters (CILA) found in recent research that 43 per cent of BI policies are underinsured by an average of 53 per cent. The following list contains the leading causes for BI underinsurance, as well as tips to remedy the problem:

  • Insufficient indemnity periods—Approximately 75 per cent of BI policies have an indemnity period of 12 months, according to industry research. However, one year is usually an unrealistic expectation for a business to have fully recovered after a disaster. To combat this issue, be sure to calculate and set a realistic indemnity period that gives your business an appropriate time span to reach financial stability. This period typically falls between 18 and 24 months.
  • Inadequate sums insured for BI policies—Often, inadequate insurance sums for BI policies stem from outdated, roughly estimated or altogether incorrect valuations on commercial properties. It is important that you think about rebuild costs when calculating your BI policy. In addition, complete an annual review of your policy with your broker to ensure the accuracy of your valuation as your business (and your property) develops and changes throughout the years.
  • Failure to include wages in the gross profit calculation—In the CILA survey, 2 out of 5 respondents listed inconsistent definitions of gross profit as the primary cause of BI underinsurance. The average definition tends to exclude staff wages and utility costs, while for insurance purposes, those are crucial to calculating an appropriate gross profit. Make sure your gross profit calculation is accurate by including staff and utility costs.

Contact Direct Insurance Corporate Risks at 01277 844 360 (Head Office), 01905 675 780 (Midlands Office) & 01260 547 030 (Northern Office) today to request your technical review and to make sure that your business can survive an interruption.

visit: www.dicr.co.uk

The Overlooked Physical Exposures of a Cyber-attack

More than ever before, organisations are aware of the potential financial impact of a cyber-attack. Many wrongfully assume that the steep, monetary burden of a cyber-attack (exacerbated by new, higher fines under the GDPR) is exclusively tied to damaged digital assets, lost records, and the price of investigating and reporting a breach. While those expenses represent a considerable hit, damage to an organisation’s physical assets can be just as harmful.

Cyber-attacks that cause physical damage typically occur when a hacker gains access to a computer system that controls equipment in a manufacturing firm, refinery, power station or similar operation. After the hacker gains access to an organisation’s machinery, they can then control that equipment to damage it or other property.

These types of events can lead to major disruptions and costly damages. To safeguard their physical assets, it’s critical that organisations understand what types of businesses and assets are exposed to these attacks.

What’s at Risk?

To better understand what kinds of physical losses can occur following a breach, it’s helpful to compare cyber-attacks to a natural disaster or other industrial accident. Following these kinds of incidents, organisations often incur costs to repair and replace damaged equipment in addition to any lost revenue caused by the disruption.

Unlike natural disasters, however, cyber-attacks that cause physical damage aren’t limited to a geographic location and can impact an entire network. This means that damages caused by a breach can be widespread, affecting multiple sectors of the economy depending on the target.

Because of this, cyber-attacks that cause physical damage are often dynamic and extensive. When an attack on critical infrastructure occurs, it not only affects business owners and operators, but suppliers, stakeholders and customers as well.

Who’s at Risk?

Cyber-attacks that cause physical damage—the targets, the assailants, the motivations and the means of the attack—are constantly evolving. Incidents can occur in a variety of ways, including phishing scams, internet exchange point attacks, breaches of unsecured and unencrypted devices, and even plots carried out by rogue employees.

When discussing these attacks, many experts cite power and energy sector organisations as the most at risk. However, vulnerabilities also exist in utilities, telecommunications, oil and petrol, petrochemicals, mining and manufacturing, and any other sectors where industrial control systems (ICSs) are used.

ICSs are open computer systems used to monitor and control physical processes as well as streamline operations and repairs. ICSs are not often designed with security as a primary consideration, which leaves them susceptible to attack. What’s more, for many automated processes, attacks don’t even need to cause physical damage to result in significant disruption and losses.

So, when it comes to the emerging risk of cyber-attacks that cause physical damage, targets vary by industry and the damages can be extensive due to the interconnected nature of ICSs.

Real-world Examples

Because organisations are not always required to make cyber-attacks that cause physical damage public, they largely go unreported. However, the following are a number of high-profile incidents that demonstrate how important it is to consider physical and infrastructure cyber-exposures:

  • Ukrainian power grid attack—This was a multistage, multisite attack that disconnected seven 110 kilovolt (kV) and three 35 kV substations. Together, the attack resulted in a power outage for 80,000 people and lasted for three hours. Using only a phishing scam, the attackers were able to cause substantial, prolonged disruption to the economy and general public.
  • Saudi Arabian computer attacks—In these incidents, hackers destroyed thousands of computers across six organisations in the energy, manufacturing and aviation industries. Through a simple virus aimed at stealing data, computers were wiped and bricked. Not only did this mean critical business data was lost forever, but all of the damaged computers had to be replaced—a substantial fee for businesses of any size. This attack was similar to an attack on Saudi Aramco, the world’s largest oil company, which destroyed 35,000 computers.
  • Petrochemical plant attack—This attack targeted a Saudi Arabian petrochemical plant. The attack was unique in that it wasn’t designed to steal data, but rather sabotage operations and trigger an explosion. The only thing that prevented an explosion was a mistake in the attackers’ computer code. Had the attack been successful, the plant would likely have been destroyed and many employees could have died. Experts are concerned that similar attacks could be carried out across the globe.
  • Hospital ventilation attack—In this incident, a hacker was able to damage and control a hospital’s heating and air conditioning system using malware. This attack put the safety of staff, patients and medical supplies in jeopardy, as the hacker could control the temperature of the facilities at will.

Attacks causing physical damage will likely become increasingly common as technology advances and hackers continue to get more creative. Even more concerning is that these kinds of attacks not only endanger a company’s data, reputation and finances, but human lives as well.

How Do I Protect My Organisation?

Insurance cover for cyber-attacks that cause physical damage is still in its infancy, and your organisation may have gaps in protection. Even if your commercial property insurance policy includes physical or non-physical damage covers, that does not necessarily mean you’re covered from first- or third-party losses from cyber-attacks.

The level of protection your company has depends largely on the structure of your policies. As such, it’s critical for businesses to do their due diligence and understand if their policies do the following:

  • Impose any limits on cover, particularly as it relates to physical damage of tangible property
  • Cover an attack and any resulting damages
  • Provide contingent cover for attacks that aren’t specifically targeted at the organisation

While it’s important to speak with a qualified insurance broker about your cyber-risk policy options, there are a number of steps businesses can take by themselves to protect their physical assets. In addition to implementing a cyber-risk management plan, businesses should consider doing the following to protect their data:

  1. Keep all software up to date.
  2. Back up files regularly.
  3. Train employees on common cyber-risks and what they should do if they notice anything suspicious.
  4. Review your exposures and speak with your insurance broker to discuss policy options for transferring risk.

For more cyber-related content, contact Direct Insurance Corporate Risks today.

website: www.dicr.co.uk

email: info@direct-ins.co.uk

telephone: 01277 844 360

Most Efficient Lorries Will Pay Less Tax in 2019

Beginning February 2019, lorries meeting the most recent Euro 6 emissions standards will be eligible for a 10 per cent reduction in the cost of the heavy goods vehicle (HGV) levy. Lorries that don’t meet the latest emissions standards will be expected to pay 20 per cent more in their HGV levy.

Currently, the HGV levy is up to £10 a day or £1,000 a year, depending on the vehicle’s size and weight. However, the amount of emissions will also be a determining factor for the levy sometime in the future.

The change is a part of the government’s programme to improve air quality and reduce emissions, as lorries with the cleanest emissions produce 80 per cent less nitrogen than dirtier ones, according to the Department for Transport’s research.

What Are the Euro 6 Standards?
The Euro 6 standards apply to all new cars registered after 1 September 2015 and defines acceptable limits for exhaust emissions. The limits are as follows:

Petrol

  • Carbon monoxide: 1.0 g/km
  • Hydrocarbons: 0.10 g/km
  • Nitrogen: 0.06 g/km
  • Particulate matter (direct injection only): 0.005 g/km
  • Particulate matter (direct injection only): 6.0×10^11/km

Diesel

  • Carbon monoxide: 0.5 g/km
  • Hydrocarbons and nitrogen: 0.17 g/km
  • Nitrogen: 0.08 g/km
  • Particulate matter: 0.005 g/km
  • Particulate matter: 6.0×10^11/km

Who Will Likely Be Affected?
Companies operating HGVs will be most impacted, especially if vehicles in their fleet were manufactured before 2015. Vehicles manufactured after September 2015 should meet emissions standards.

How Can I Comply?
If a vehicle fails to meet the emissions standards, there are a few options available to help reduce the amount of emissions produced by the vehicle.

  • Have the vehicle regularly serviced.
  • Instal in-cab technologies that monitor driving and provide performance feedback to help encourage driver behaviours that lower emissions.
  • Encourage your drivers to drive more smoothly, which helps increase fuel efficiency and thus reduce emissions and costs.

However, one of the most effective methods to ensure that a vehicle complies with emissions standards is to instal a selective catalytic reduction system, which reduces nitrogen emissions. Another option is injecting fuel tanks with cerium each time you refuel the vehicle, which helps optimise the diesel particulate filter.

Drive Clean, Breathe Easy
For more compliance information, contact Direct Insurance Corporate Risks today.

website: www.dicr.co.uk

email: info@direct-ins.co.uk

Telephone: 01277 844 360